It's OK. I know I have a problem.

As far back as I can remember, I've been obsessed with the "Back to the Future" trilogy (let's be honest, the 3rd one wasn't amazing, but, moving on). Whenever I need a test user name, placeholder text, or even an image for a project at work, I populate my code with references from my favorite movie.

I've been using Übersicht on my desktop lately to keep track of our team's git repositories. Below is a widget to display recent commits to your selected git repository. The widget allows you to select the branch of your project to display the log from (e.g. in case your team normally commit to a 'dev' branch before master).

After a couple weeks of trying other code editors, I've decided to primarily use the feature-packed Sublime Text 3. One of the biggest advantages in Sublime Text (to name one feature out of the hundreds included) is the ability to install custom Packages that allow for an intense level of customization and functionality.

If you're like me and use multiple computers throughout the week - I use a MacBook and PC at work and an iMac and MacBook at home - it becomes increasingly important to have your standard development setup available on all computers. I have always used Dropbox to sync files, photos, and basically everything else between all of my devices, but being able to sync settings and configurations with Dropbox is an added bonus! In this post I'll explain how to set up Dropbox to sync your Sublime Text settings and packages across all of your computers.

Over the past couple of months I have been starting to mockup a decent number of user interface designs for other developers on my team at Kindred. Once a design is semi-finalized, the developers typically start the coding process by building out assets (page components, CSS, etc.) that they then use to structure the website or application.